Social Studies

Our social studies and Judaic Studies programs support each other to emphasize the relationship between the social and behavioral sciences and religious traditions, thus providing for a systematic study of diverse cultures of the present and the past. Among our strengths are age-appropriate curriculum and assessment throughout the grades. Our block work and construction program in primary grades is an example of a “hands-on” age-appropriate program that encourages problem solving, critical thinking and ongoing teacher evaluation.

Social action and outreach are strongly emphasized at Ilan Ramon Day School. Through our social studies program, we stress the unique contributions of various people and the obligation that we each have to contribute to the collective community of today. We seek to foster a respect for divergent traditions and beliefs and a commitment to work with others for the betterment of society.

Knowledge derived from anthropology, economics, ethnic studies, geography, history, humanities, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, and the arts are woven into the content for each grade level. Values clarification, critical and creative thinking, and appreciation of varied multi-cultural components of our society are all important facets of our social science program, as we work towards educating citizens who will effectively function in our democratic society and our rapidly changing world.

Social studies and Judaic Studies skills and concepts are assessed in a variety of ways. Classroom dialogue, where teachers can observe student participation and quality of answers, occurs on a daily basis. A three-dimensional project to culminate and display accumulated knowledge also accompanies each unit. Quick-writes following field trips, original stories incorporating historical concepts, plays and vignettes to perform varying aspects of social studies events and Judaic Studies concepts are frequently-used assessment strategies. As students progress chronologically, essays, short-answer tests, objective tests, research papers, and Socratic dialogues lend a more in-depth assessment of students’ integration of social studies and Judaic Studies concepts.